Bullying Information

WHAT IS BULLYING?
Bullying occurs when a student or group of students targets an individual repeatedly over a period of time. It can involve direct attacks (such as hitting, threatening or intimidating, maliciously teasing and taunting, name-calling, making sexual remarks, and stealing or damaging belongings) or more subtle, indirect attacks (such as spreading rumors or encouraging others to reject or exclude someone).

A complete parent brochure, courtesy of Lebanon High School and Lebanon Police Department  is attached below.  

FACTS ABOUT BULLYING

Bullying is often dismissed as part of
growing up, but is actually an early
form of aggressive, violent behavior.
  • Every day nearly 160,000 children miss 
    school because they are scared of 
    bullying.
  • Statistics show that one in four 
    children who bully will have a criminal 
    record before the age of 30, with 60% 
    having at least one criminal conviction.
  • When friends help out, 57% of the 
    time bullying stops in 10 seconds.
  • Over 5.7 million teens in the United 
    States are estimated to be involved in 
    bullying.
  • In a study of junior high and high 
    school students, over 88% said they 
    had witnessed bullying in their schools.
Additional Resources
KIDS THAT BULLY

According to the National Crime Prevention Council:
  • Lack empathy and don't sympathize 
    with others.
  • Are generally physically aggressive, hot 
    tempered and impulsive.
  • Like to be in charge.
  • May be an arrogant winner and a sore 
    loser.
  • Fight often with brothers and sisters.
  • May smoke and drink alcohol.

KIDS WHO ARE BULLIED

According to the National Crime 
Prevention Council:
  • Are different from other kids, whether 
    by size, race, sexual preference, etc.
  • Seem weak, either physically or
  • emotionally.
  • Have low self-esteem or may be 
    insecure.
  • May be withdrawn or depressed.
  • Lose interest in activities he or she 
    previously enjoyed.
  • Do poorly in school or have a 
    significant drop in grades.
  • Usually won’t tell on their bullies.
  • May turn to violent behavior to 
    protect themselves or get revenge on 
  • their bullies.

KIDS THAT SEE BULLYING
  • Feel angry, helpless, and guilty.
  • Don’t feel safe where bullying takes place (hallways in school, on the bus, in the park, or online).
  • Feel compelled to end a friendship or avoid being seen with the bullied teen to avoid losing status or being targeted themselves.
  • Fear they will become the next victim.
WHAT PARENTS CAN DO
  • Take bullying seriously! Probing a minor complaint may uncover more serious grievances.
  • Don’t treat bullying as a passing phase.
  • Listen! Encourage kids to talk about school, other kids in class and the walk or ride to and from school.
  • Teach children to be assertive.
  • Emphasize peaceful ways to problem-solve and encourage them to stand up for themselves verbally not violently.
  • Show kids safe ways to help others.
  • Make it clear that you expect them to tell an adult if they see someone
  • being bullied or are bullied.
  • Watch for symptoms that children may be bullying victims.
  • Recognize that bullies may be acting out feelings of insecurity, anger or loneliness.
  • Tell the school immediately if you think your child is bullying or being bullied.

For more information, contact:

Lebanon High School
195 Hanover Street
Lebanon, NH 03766
(603) – 448 – 2055

Lebanon Police Department
36 Poverty Lane
Lebanon, NH 03766
(603) – 448 – 1212

Ċ
Andrew DiGiovanni,
Mar 22, 2011, 8:30 AM
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