NEASC‎ > ‎

Assessment

Overview:
Assessment informs students and stakeholders of progress and growth toward meeting the school's 21st century learning expectations. Assessment results are shared and discussed on a regular basis to improve student learning. Assessment results inform teachers about student achievement in order to adjust curriculum and instruction.

Indicators:

Indicator 1
The professional staff continuously employs a formal process, based on school-wide rubrics, to assess whole-school and individual student progress in achieving the school’s 21st century learning expectations.

What to Look for:

  • there is a formal, ongoing process, based on the school-wide analytic rubrics, that has been developed and fully implemented to assess both whole-school and individual student progress in achieving each of the school’s 21st century learning expectations
  • individual student performance is evaluated and analyzed based on the school-wide analytic rubrics that clearly designate the range and levels of success in achieving the school’s 21st century leaning expectations
Indicator 2:   
The school’s professional staff communicates:
  • individual student progress in achieving the school’s 21st century learning expectations to students and their families
  • the school’s progress in achieving the school’s 21st century learning expectations to the school community.

What to Look for:

§         the school has identified benchmark dates/times throughout the school year when it communicates in writing to all students and their families related to individual student progress in achieving each of the 21st century learning expectations

§         the school communicated to the larger school community the whole school’s progress in achieving each of its 21st century leaning expectations

Indicator 3:
  
Professional staff collects, disaggregates, and analyzes data to identify and respond to inequities in student achievement.

What to Look for:

  • the professional staff collects, disaggregates, and analyzes, a range and variety of data, including both formative and summative assessments, to identify inequities in student achievement
  • the professional staff regularly uses the data to inform changes/modification in curriculum design and instructional practices to resolve these inequities on a regular basis, including analysis at the conclusion of a unit of study, in the review of common assessments given during mid-year of final exams; student portfolios and end of semester or yearly performance projects
Indicator 4: 
Prior to each unit of study, teachers communicate to students the school’s applicable 21st century learning expectations and related unit-specific learning goals to be assessed.

What to Look for:

  • teachers articulate what students are expected to know and be able to demonstrate
  • teachers explain which of the school’s 21st century skills and expectations as well as content-based understandings and applications of knowledge that are required
  • teachers identify in all types of assignments using classroom and electronic postings, oral assignments, and major projects the specific 21st century learning expectations and/or course-specific expectations

Indicator 5:
Prior to summative assessments, teachers provide students with the corresponding rubrics.

What to Look for:

·         teachers provide students with the school-wide analytic and/or course-specific rubrics that will be used to assess their learning


Indicator 6:
  In each unit of study, teachers employ a range of assessment strategies, including formative and summative assessments. 

What to Look for:

·         teachers understand and use a range of  formative and summative  assessment strategies

·         teachers regularly use formative assessments by explaining what students are expected to learn and what learning activities will be used, providing exemplars for assignments/projects, by assessing learning on a day-to-day basis through observation, conversations with students on an individual basis or in small groups, reviewing student progress-to-date, and encouraging student reworking of assignments and self-assessment

·         teachers appropriately use summative assessments such as state test results, district benchmark, end-of-unit chapter tests, end-of-term or semester exams, and scores used for accountability purposes such as AYP


Indicator 7:  Teachers collaborate regularly in formal ways on the creation, analysis, and revision of formative and summative assessments, including common assessments.

What to Look for:

  • the school has designated formal time for teachers, department leaders, and building administrators to collaborate regularly about assessment practices
  • the professional staff reviews summative assessment data/results and makes modifications based on student learning in curriculum and instructional practices throughout the school year
  • the professional staff reviews formative assessment results and makes modifications to curriculum and instructional practices throughout the school year
  • the professional staff focuses increased attention on common assessment both within common courses and across curricular areas (common writing assignments, student exhibitions and portfolios, and major projects)
  • all grade ten English teachers look at a sample of student essays to determine if the current writing rubric is appropriate
  • the school maintains an appropriate balance between formative and summative assessments to ensure that daily, ongoing student learning is assessed
Indicator 8:  Teachers provide specific, timely, and corrective feedback to ensure students revise and improve their work.

What to Look for:

  • teachers use formative assessment practices to monitor and assess in the short-term students’ work and provide students with immediate opportunities to revise/resubmit their work before their work is formally assessed
  • teachers review results of summative assessments and provide feedback to students prior to moving on to a new unit of study
Indicator 9:  Teachers regularly use formative assessment to inform and adapt their instruction for the purpose of improving student learning.

What to Look for:

  • teacher collaboration occurs on a regular basis for the expressed purpose of using formative assessment results to determine appropriate, necessary changes in instructional practices such as, lower than anticipated results on the school’s analytic rubrics for writing suggests that students need some differentiated instruction, or additional opportunities to revise their writing following individual feedback to students
Indicator 10:  Teachers and administrators, individually and collaboratively, examine a range of evidence of student learning for the purpose of revising curriculum and improving instructional practice, including all of the following:
  • student work
  • common course and common grade-level assessments
  • individual and school-wide progress in achieving the school’s 21st century learning expectations
  • standardized assessments
  • data from sending schools, receiving schools, and post-secondary institutions
  • survey data from current students and alumni.

What to Look for:

·    teachers shall meet collaboratively to discuss and share student work and the results of student assessments for the purposes of revising the curriculum and improving instructional strategies

Indicator 11:  Grading and reporting practices are regularly reviewed and revised to ensure alignment with the school’s core values and beliefs about learning.

What to Look for:

  • the professional staff regularly reviews the school’s grading practices to ensure they reflect the balanced use by all teachers of formative assessments, summative assessments and common assessments
  • the professional staff regularly reviews teachers’ consistent use of the school-wide analytic rubrics in determining individual student progress in achieving the school’s learning expectations and makes appropriate changes in its grading policies
  • the professional staff ensures that grading practices are consistent across all subject areas and by all teachers
  • the professional staff is focused on standards-based grading practices which measure student proficiency and promote mixed ability grouping

R AT I N G   G U I D E

Assessment Of and For Student Learning

 

A rating of DEFICIENT is appropriate if any of the following exist: 

  • The school does not have a formal process, based on school-wide rubrics, to assess whole-school and individual student progress in achieving the school’s 21st century learning expectations
  • Teachers, generally, fail to provide specific, timely, and corrective feedback to ensure students revise and improve their work  
  • Teachers, generally, fail to regularly use formative assessments, including school-wide rubrics   

A rating of LIMITED is appropriate if the school does have a formal process, based on school-wide rubrics, to assess whole-school and individual student progress in achieving the school’s 21st century learning expectations; teachers generally provide specific, timely, and corrective feedback to ensure students revise and improve their work;and teachers generally use formative assessments, including school-wide rubrics, but:

  • Teachers, generally, fail, prior to each unit of study, to communicate to students the school’s applicable 21st century learning expectations and related unit-specific learning goals to be assessed
  • Teachers, generally, fail, prior to summative assessments, to provide students with the corresponding rubrics 
  • Teachers, generally, fail to use formative assessments to inform and adapt their instruction for the purpose of improving student learning
  • Grading and reporting practices are not regularly reviewed and revised to ensure alignment with the school’s core values and beliefs about learning

A rating of ACCEPTABLE is appropriate if the school does have a formal process, based on school-wide rubrics, to assess whole-school and individual student progress in achieving the school’s 21st century learning expectations; teachers generally provide specific, timely, and corrective feedback to ensure students revise and improve their work, and teachers generally use formative assessments, including school-wide rubrics; and teachers generally also use formative assessments to inform and adapt their instruction for the purpose of improving student learning; teachers generally, prior to each unit of study, communicate to students the school’s applicable 21st century learning expectations and related unit specific learning goals to be assessed;  teachers generally, prior to summative assessments, provide students with the corresponding rubrics; grading and reporting practices are regularly reviewed and revised to ensure alignment with the school’s core values and beliefs about learning; and: 

  • Professional staff collects, disaggregates, and analyzes data to identify and respond to inequities in student achievement
  • Teachers and administrators, individually and collaboratively, examine a range of evidence of student learning for the purpose of revising curriculum and improving instructional practice, including most of the following: 
    • student work  
    • common course and common grade-level assessments
    • individual and school-wide progress in achieving the school’s 21st century learning expectations
    • standardized assessments
    • data from sending schools, receiving schools, and post-secondary institutions
    • survey data from current students and alumni
  • The school’s professional staff communicates: 
    • individual student progress in achieving the school’s 21st century learning expectations to students and their families
    • the school’s progress in achieving the school’s 21st century learning expectations to the school community 

A rating of EXEMPLARY is appropriate if all the descriptors in the ACCEPTABLE rating are met and:

  • Teachers collaborate regularly in formal ways on the creation, analysis, and revision of formative and summative assessments, including common assessments 
  • In each unit of study, teachers employ a range of assessment strategies, including formative and summative assessments  

Comments